Holy Cow!

I’ve just deleted the post I started writing two hours ago (admittedly, FB and Insta got in the way, but I digress). You see, I’ve just read the funniest story on Stuff and in a roundabout way, it’s related to today’s recipe.

I know the theft of 500 cows isn’t funny for the farmer. At all. However, the question remains, how the heck does one steal 500 cows in New Zealand? It’s not like they are easy to hide. Where have they gone?

I guess we’ll all know what happened if sports clubs around the country are inundated with meat packs this weekend (to the tune of 20,000 or so appearing from nowhere in particular).

I do hope there is a happy end to this story and the missing bovines don’t become one of the mysteries of our time.

What isn’t so mysterious is how to make a great panna cotta (cream-cows, get the connection?). I’ve written of my favourite dessert before, but had to share my latest discovery. As part of the gastronomic gorgeous-ness that is Wellington on Plate (don’t get me started on the WOAP branding though – ekkkk), I went to a lovely little tea and chocolate event last week. And so glad that I did or I would not have come across Fine and Dandy Tea (what a gorgeous name and brand don’t ya think!). The lovely Sarah talked through some of their blends. We then tasted them alongside bean to bar choccie. Heaven.

My favourite was the delicate lemongrass, ginger and kawakawa blend. Such a nourishing and warming treat. Sitting here one night enjoying a cup, I decided to try infusing cream with it and am stoked that I did. The result was subtle and delicious. The dinner guests were as happy as me. Here’s the recipe so that you, too, can enjoy this treat.

20160825_183318What you’ll need (to make 4 dessert size or 10 mini panna cotta)

300 ml cream (I’ve used Lewis Road Creamery single and double cream, both with success)

100 ml milk (I use full cream or homogenised)

1½ heaped tsp Fine and Dany lemongrass, ginger and kawakawa tea

4 grams leaf gelatine (mine weigh 2g each)

Cold water

60gm caster sugar

How to make it

20160825_183546Put the cream, milk and tea in a saucepan and gently heat until boiling point. Turn the heat off before it boils, give the liquid a mix and set aside for an hour or two to infuse. You can cool it and pop into the fridge if you are not making the dessert straight away.

When ready to make the panna cotta:

Soak the gelatine leaves in cold water (around 100-200ml). Set aside so they swell.

20160825_195941Strain the cream/milk to remove the tea leaves and put into a clean saucepan (top up to make 400ml in total with extra milk or cream). Add the caster sugar and heat the mixture again until boiling point, giving it a stir to help dissolve the sugar. Turn off the heat before it boils. Remove pan from the heat.

20160825_202526Squeeze the water from the gelatine leaves and add to the cream mixture. Mix through with a wooden spoon until the leaves have melted.

Pour the mixture into a clean container and set aside until cold. This step is important if you want to avoid gelatine separation.

20160825_223256Give the mixture a stir, then strain into a jug.

20160825_224932Pour the mixture into moulds. Cover and refrigerate for four-six hours until set.

When ready to serve, briefly dip the mould into hot water and then turn out on to your serving plate. Garnish as desired.

20160822_210956I like to make these as minis and serve on shortbread – or, in this case, mini gingerbread cookies. I’ve topped these ones with cocoa nibs.

Treat yourself, buy some yummy tea and dairy products. This panna cotta is seriously delicious. (PS.: Neither Fine and Dandy nor LRC pay me to say this – I just love their products.)

Tea Infused Panna Cotta- imustgetaroundtoit.com

  • Servings: 4-10, depending on size
  • Difficulty: medium
  • Print

Ingredients

300 ml cream (I’ve used Lewis Road Creamery single and double cream, both with success)

100 ml milk (I use full cream or homogenised)

1½ heaped tsp Fine and Dany lemongrass, ginger and kawakawa tea

4 grams leaf gelatine (mine weigh 2g each)

Cold water

60gm caster sugar

Method

Put the cream, milk and tea in a saucepan and gently heat until boiling point. Turn the heat off before it boils, give the liquid a mix and set aside for an hour or two to infuse. You can cool it and pop into the fridge if you are not making the dessert straight away.

When ready to make the panna cotta: Soak the gelatine leaves in cold water (around 100-200ml). Set aside so they swell.

Strain the cream/milk to remove the tea leaves and put into a clean saucepan (top up to make 400ml in total with extra milk or cream). Add the caster sugar and heat the mixture again until boiling point, giving it a stir to help dissolve the sugar. Turn off the heat before it boils. Remove pan from the heat.

Squeeze the water from the gelatine leaves and add to the cream mixture. Mix through with a wooden spoon until the leaves have melted.

Pour the mixture into a clean container and set aside until cold. This step is important if you want to avoid gelatine separation.

Give the mixture a stir, then strain into a jug.

Pour the mixture into moulds. Cover and refrigerate for four-six hours until set.

When ready to serve, briefly dip the mould into hot water and then turn out on to your serving plate. Garnish as desired.

I like to make these as minis and serve on shortbread – or, in this case, mini gingerbread cookies.

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